On The Runway

The Best of London Fashion Week, Fall/Winter 2014

London Fashion Week, Fall/Winter 2014, Catwalk, Reviews, Fashion, Style, Burberry Prorsum, Christopher Kane, JW Anderson, Osman, Simone Rocha, Tom Ford, Thomas Tait
Burberry Prorsum (left) and Christopher Kane (right)

While London may be known for its edgy fashion there were a surprising amount of wearable clothes on the catwalk. That being said the cool factor was still evident thanks to details like techno fabrics, bold colours and sculptural silhouettes. Here are the collections we loved.

Burberry Prorsum

Ok while the jury is still out on Christopher Bailey’s capability as Burberry’s CEO, he is still a talented designer. Sure clashing prints and Bloomsbury inspired florals aren’t exactly groundbreaking but they kinda are for Burberry. There was a sense of romance and wanderlust in his collection which featured contrasting prints layered under shearling jackets, trench coats and scarves. He mixed everything well and I liked the addition of lace for a couture touch.

Christopher Kane

Christopher Kane can do no wrong it seems. His collection was dark and provocative in all the right ways – sweatshirts were given a techno twist with panels of nylon while dresses featured a hem or neckline made up of scrunched up fabric. It was all about contrasts – nylon dresses came edged with a thick border of luscious mink while a boxy dark suit was sprinkled with sparkles.  Naughty but nice, just the way we like it.

London Fashion Week, Fall/Winter 2014, Catwalk, Reviews, Fashion, Style, Burberry Prorsum, Christopher Kane, JW Anderson, Osman, Simone Rocha, Tom Ford, Thomas Tait
JW Anderson (left) and Osman (right)

JW Anderson

Much like Rick Owens, not everyone can wear JW Anderson but those that can have some serious style cred. What interests me about his work is how he twists and manipulates fabrics that you wouldn’t think possible and then moulds them into exciting new proportions. Case in point the thick bias cut skirts which appeared both stiff and fluid and the corduroy tunics with built in bustiers. Dresses looked like they were sliding off the body or came with a contrasting piece of fabric draped across the neckline.

Osman

Osman has updated his sculptural silhouettes with a surreal touch –  they came printed with eyes and hands (decorated with gold cuffs or holding handbags, no less). Apparently he was inspired by Talitha Getty, but the results were less traveller, more city.  The colours were bright and bold – think orange, electric blue and yellow but a luxe factor could be found in the patterned brocades and layered cut out tops which added an eclectic vibe.

London Fashion Week, Fall/Winter 2014, Catwalk, Reviews, Fashion, Style, Burberry Prorsum, Christopher Kane, JW Anderson, Osman, Simone Rocha, Tom Ford, Thomas Tait
Simone Rocha (left) and Tom Ford (right)

Simone Rocha

Simone Rocha’s collection was my favourite to date. Her strict sculptural forms were inspired by the Elizabethan period – think padding around the hips and ruffled sleeves – but she injected them with her signature youthful spin without making them appear any less luxe. Faux furs, embellished lace, tartan and crinkled metallic fabrics all brought the look into the 21st century.

Tom Ford

Tom Ford is back (and thankfully those Ka-Pow dresses are not). His women’s wear collections have been a bit schizophrenic since he started, but fall really honed in on who his woman is: Sexy, powerful, elegant but not afraid to take fashion risks. There were beautiful luxe classics such as the velvet dress that opened the show, tunics with lace details and tight pencil skirts. He still likes to have fun so cue the animal prints, colourful fur and sequinned basketball jerseys for the evening.

London Fashion Week, Fall/Winter 2014, Catwalk, Reviews, Fashion, Style, Burberry Prorsum, Christopher Kane, JW Anderson, Osman, Simone Rocha, Tom Ford, Thomas Tait
Thomas Tait

Thomas Tait

Who needs Rei Kawakubo when you have Thomas Tait? He cuts a mean coat, as spotted in his perfectly hourglass felt numbers, which often featured layers or panels of fabric in colours like mustard, blue, red and yellow. It got a bit futuristic with sheer tops with ribbed necklines and sheer lurex one shoulder dresses that clung to the body. It may not have been completely cohesive and the colours could be distracting – but there was so much to digest, in a good way.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*